3 More Lies I was Told in Church

 

Since writing my first post like this, 3 Lies I was Told in ChurchI have continued to notice more examples. Maybe my readers have too. The thing is, these lies are not intentional, but they have slipped in unnoticed and it’s a matter of locating and combating them.

I think it’s important to bring awareness to these areas, and so I’m doing a few more today, hoping to help people continue to realize that bits of false information can and do infiltrate even the “safest” places we know of. Hope this post is a help and challenge to you!

Lie One: Angels don’t have freewill.

I really don’t know where this came from, but this is something I was taught. I was often told that “man is the only one of God’s creations with freewill.” I was given the impression that angels were some sort of robots who only did what God wanted and NEVER, EVER had a choice or did evil. However, it is far from the truth! Angels absolutely do have freewill and they have exercised it.

Consider 2 Peter 2:4 – “…God spared not the angels that sinned, but cast them down to hell, and delivered them into chains of darkness, to be reserved unto judgment;”

Jude 1:6 says pretty much the same thing – “And the angels which kept not their first estate, but left their own habitation, he hath reserved in everlasting chains under darkness unto the judgment of the great day.”

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What angels are Peter and Jude talking about? I believe they are talking about the angels from Genesis chapter six.

Genesis 6:1-2 – “And it came to pass, when men began to multiply on the face of the earth, and daughters were born unto them, That the sons of God saw the daughters of men that they were fair; and they took them wives of all which they chose.”

The “sons of God” in that passage refers to angels. These angels left their estate in heaven and came to earth and transgressed, having children with human women. We aren’t told a lot about these half human, half angels, except that they were giants (that particular Hebrew word, nephil, also meaning tyrants, or bullies). They were mighty men, and very well known in the world at that time.

I think that this directly connects with what we’re told in 1 Corinthians 6:3 – “Know ye not that we shall judge angels?…” You see, they came and interfered in our world, doing things that they were not commanded to do, and thus brought about that race of “bullies”. It is only just that they should be judged of us.

Angels aren’t actually the only other creation of God containing some form of freewill. Jude says, Jude 1:12-13 “…clouds they are without water, carried about of winds; trees whose fruit withereth, without fruit, twice dead, plucked up by the roots; Raging waves of the sea, foaming out their own shame; wandering stars, to whom is reserved the blackness of darkness for ever.”

It appears stars, too, have the ability to transgress, and those who have will be punished for it. But that is off subject….

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Lie Two: While Noah built the ark, people mocked him.

Thanks to a comment by Esther on my former post for directing my attention to this one. Were you ever told that Noah was made fun of while he built the ark? I was! And the truth is, the Bible never says that.

In fact, while examining this subject, I was struck by something Jesus says in Matthew 24: “For as in the days that were before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the ark, And knew not until the flood came, and took them all away; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.”

If you read that carefully, it appears that everyone else was not even aware, or completely disregarding of the fact that Noah was building an ark. “And knew not until the flood came, and took them all away…”

 

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We know that Noah did preach to them, as it says in 2 Peter 2:5, “And [God] spared not the old world, but saved Noah the eighth person, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood upon the world of the ungodly;” Apparently they either didn’t believe him or didn’t care.

Actually, there is another lie we are told about this story. Anyone ever tell you that when it started raining, people started pounding on the door of the ark? Simply more speculation. It very well may have happened, but the Bible doesn’t say.

Lie Three: God doesn’t hate anyone {hates the sin loves the sinner}.

This one may or may not shatter a lot of your ideas about God. A lot of people find it too brutal, so they just deny it and make up unbiblical quotes like “God hates the sin but loves the sinner.”

This is found absolutely nowhere in the Bible.

In fact, there are many passages where God talks about a person or persons that He hates.

Psalms 5:5 – “The foolish shall not stand in thy sight: thou hatest all workers of iniquity.”

Psalms 11:5 – “The LORD trieth the righteous: but the wicked and him that loveth violence his soul hateth.

Proverbs 6:16, 19 – “These six things doth the LORD hate: yea, seven are an abomination unto him:… A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren.”

Malachi 1:3 – “And I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.”

Romans 9:13 – “As it is written, Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated.”

Hereon I rest my case.

~LDC

Did any of these surprise you? Was it helpful to you? What were your thoughts as you read? I’d love it if you left me a comment!

Thank you for reading! 

 

 

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6 thoughts on “3 More Lies I was Told in Church

  1. Good thoughts, Leah! 🙂 I was just reading Acts 17 this morning, where the Bereans searched the Scriptures to see if what Paul and Silas taught was true. God’s word is the ultimate authority!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I would humbly submit that our language of God is anthropomorphic, meaning that our words can never capture who God truly is because God is “ineffable,” or beyond description by human language. So imo the “hatred” by God that we see in Scripture isn’t descriptive but rather a reflection of the biblical writer’s (and God’s) passion for justice.

    Liked by 1 person

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